History

World Cultures

Grade 9

2 Semesters 


A study of the geography, history, and cultures of regions around the world.  Students will learn valuable reading, comprehension, and writing skills while studying the important societies of our world.  The class takes students through regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.   Students will examine the languages, religions, art, and traditions that define the cultures found within them.  They will use a variety of resources, tools, and technology to deepen their understanding and achieve success. This course introduces students to the skills and concepts necessary to begin their study of history and provides them with the knowledge and opportunities to more fully understand and participate in the global community.      

Honors World Cultures

Grade 9

2 Semesters 


A study of the geography, history, and cultures of regions around the world.  Students will learn valuable reading, comprehension, and writing skills while studying the important societies of our world.  The class takes students through regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. studying Students will examine the languages, religions, art, and traditions that define the cultures found within them.  They will use a variety of resources, tools, and technology to deepen their understanding and achieve success. This course introduces students to the skills and concepts necessary to begin their study of history and provides them with the knowledge and opportunities to more fully understand and participate in the global community.  This class requires students to complete more complex readings and more frequent writing assignments.  The class will take topics into more depth; students in this program must prepare to work independently, participate in focused class discussions, and share their ideas and insights through a variety of channels.

United States History I

Grade 10 or 11

2 Semesters 

This course explores the history of the United States from the American Revolution to the Gilded Age. Units of study included the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, Nationalism and Sectionalism, Westward Expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction and its Legacy,and the Gilded Age. Students interested in AP United States History are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Students will be assessed on factual information as well as on their ability to analyze and draw connections between historical events. Assessments will take a variety of forms, including quizzes, objective tests, in-class and at home essays, and periodic graded homework assignments.

 

United States History II

Grade 11 or 12

2 Semesters Level 3 

This course explores the history of the United States from the Spanish American War until the 2000s. Units of study included, the Spanish American War, Progressivism, World War I, The Jazz Age, The Depression, World War II, The Cold War, Civil Rights, and Modern Topics in US History.  Students will be assessed on factual information as well as on their ability to analyze and draw connections between historical events. Students will demonstrate knowledge through various forms of authentic assessment.  Some will be traditional, such as unit tests, essays, and research projects, while others will be non-traditional, such as flipped classroom and project-based learning. 


 

United States Government and Politics

Grade 11 or 12

2 Semesters Level 3 

This course provides an introductory examination of the U.S. political system, including the development of its framework, traditions, and values over the past 200 years. Themes/topics include the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government; institutions of the national government; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; political beliefs and behaviors; civil rights and civil liberties; and public policy. Discussion of current events will help students to apply theory and concepts to relevant daily experience. 

AP United States History

Designed to provide students with the factual knowledge, historical thinking, and composition skills necessary to complete the Advanced Placement exam and prepare students for future college level courses.   The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands equivalent to those made by introductory college courses. This APUSH course will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of a well-informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

Prerequisite: 
Must have History department approval to enroll in this course with grade requirements of a 93 average in an Honors level course and a 95 in regular level courses.

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.
 


Honors Topics in United States History

Grades 9,  10 and 11

2 Semesters Level 2


This course is a thematic survey of American historical, political, and social developments from the establishment of the English Colonies (beginning in the 1600s) to the Modern Era. A variety of classroom techniques expose the students to the rigors of an Advanced Placement level course and attempts to prepare the student for AP level courses. Students interested in AP United States History and AP United States Government are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course Students will develop critical thinking skills, analyze primary sources, research methodology skills, place events in context, and understand the role of the political process in history as a result of this course. This course requires extensive writing assignments, research, and class discussion. Students will demonstrate knowledge through various forms of authentic assessment. Some will be traditional, such as unit tests, essays, and research projects, while others will be non-traditional, such as flipped classroom and project-based learning. Department approval is required for admission into this course.   There will be a summer reading requirement.

AP United States Government and Politics

Designed to give students a critical perspective of politics and government.  Students will analyze and discuss the importance of various constitutional principles, rights and procedures, institutions, and political processes that impact U.S. citizens.  Units of study include the constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups and mass media; institutions of national government, public policy, and civil rights and civil liberties.

Prerequisite:  
85 in previous AP level History classes, 93 in previous Honors level History classes, and 95 in previous College Prep level History classes as well as department approval.

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.


Topics in United States History

Grade 11

2 semesters, Level 2

 In this course, students will study United States history from the Industrial Age to the present.  Cultural, economic, political, and social events of the period will be explored through research, discussion, writing assignments, and long-term projects.  Topics will include industry and innovation, immigration, desire to build an empire, U.S. emergence as a world power, World War I, the Roaring 20s, the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and recent presidential administrations.  Students will learn not only historical facts, but how to analyze point of view, make connections between events, and assess the actions of American leaders over the past century.  The course will require a great deal of participation from the students.  History Department approval is required to enter this course, and there will be a summer reading assignment. 

Honors United States Government and Politics

Grades 11 and 12

2 Semesters Level 2 

This course provides an examination of the U.S. political system, including the development of its framework, traditions, and values over the past 200 years. Themes/topics include the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government; institutions of the national government; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; political beliefs and behaviors; and civil rights and civil liberties. Discussion of current events will help students to apply theory and concepts to relevant daily experience. This course is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Historical research and analysis of historical documents will be required, as well as assigned summer readings. Department approval is required for admission to this course.

 

AP Human Geography

Human geography examines the patterns and processes of human activity on Earth, employing the use of spatial data and analysis to answer geographic questions that apply to our world today.  Topics introduced in this course include geographic inquiry, population and migration, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, development, and both agricultural and urban land use.  Students will be required to read college-level texts, understand, interpret, and analyze maps and other forms of spatial data, and think critically to solve problems.  As described in the College Board Course Description, at the completion of this class, students will be able to:

(a) interpret maps and geospatial data,  (b) understand and explain the implications of associations and networks among phenomena in places,  (c) recognize and interpret the relationships among patterns and processes at different scales of analysis,  (d) define regions and evaluate the regionalization process, and  (e) characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places.

Prerequisite:  To move from College Prep level to AP Human Geography: 95 first semester average. To move from Honors level to AP Human Geography: 93 first semester average.  From a current AP class to AP Human Geography: 85 first semester average.

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.

 

Honors Comparative Government and Politics

Grades 11 and 12

1 Semester Level 2

Honors Comparative Government and Politics is a one semester course that introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues. This course is an elective open to all those who have completed or know they will complete their required History coursework. Department approval is required for admission into this course, and there will be a summer reading assignment.

AP Comparative Government and Politics

Introduces the fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. This course aims to communicate the importance of global political and economic changes. We will examine six countries and their governments including China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria and Russia. The political system of the United States will be referenced as a point of comparison but this is not a US Government course. For each of these countries we will examine issues such as party politics, political history, bureaucracy, budgetary process, civil rights and civil liberties, and public policy.

*Not an American government course

Prerequisite:
Students must have History Department approval to enroll in this course with grade requirements of a 93 average in an Honors level course and a 95 in regular level courses.

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.

AP Art History

Designed to give students the opportunity to discover, appreciate, and acquire knowledge of art history through the ages, from global prehistory to contemporary times. The students will learn to examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from diverse cultures and understand their contributions to the arts. The curriculum is modeled after introductory college level art history survey courses and reflects the College Board AP Art History Course Description. Tests and quizzes are given throughout the year using the format of the AP Art History Exam with multiple choice, short answer, and long essay questions, some of which are based on slides. Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Art History examination.

Prerequisites: 
Must have History department approval to enroll in this course with grade requirements of a 93 average in an Honors level course and a 95 in regular level courses.

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.

AP Seminar


AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in researchbased written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

Prerequisite:
GPA of 93 and approval from the Vice Principal

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.

AP Research (offered Fall 2017)

Allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of approximately 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense.

Prerequisite: 
GPA of 93 and approval from the Vice Principal

Note:
Entrance into AP classes is by invitation based on achieved scores.
AP students must take the exam for AP, and families are financially responsible for the associated fees.