History

World Cultures

Grade 9

2 Semesters 


A study of the geography, history, and cultures of regions around the world.  Students will learn valuable reading, comprehension, and writing skills while studying the important societies of our world.  The class takes students through regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.   Students will examine the languages, religions, art, and traditions that define the cultures found within them.  They will use a variety of resources, tools, and technology to deepen their understanding and achieve success. This course introduces students to the skills and concepts necessary to begin their study of history and provides them with the knowledge and opportunities to more fully understand and participate in the global community.      

Honors World Cultures

Grade 9

2 Semesters 


A study of the geography, history, and cultures of regions around the world.  Students will learn valuable reading, comprehension, and writing skills while studying the important societies of our world.  The class takes students through regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. studying Students will examine the languages, religions, art, and traditions that define the cultures found within them.  They will use a variety of resources, tools, and technology to deepen their understanding and achieve success. This course introduces students to the skills and concepts necessary to begin their study of history and provides them with the knowledge and opportunities to more fully understand and participate in the global community.  This class requires students to complete more complex readings and more frequent writing assignments.  The class will take topics into more depth; students in this program must prepare to work independently, participate in focused class discussions, and share their ideas and insights through a variety of channels.

United States History I

Grade 10 or 11

2 Semesters 

This course explores the history of the United States from the American Revolution to the Gilded Age. Units of study included the American Revolution, the Constitutional Convention, Nationalism and Sectionalism, Westward Expansion, the Civil War, Reconstruction and its Legacy,and the Gilded Age. Students interested in AP United States History are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Students will be assessed on factual information as well as on their ability to analyze and draw connections between historical events. Assessments will take a variety of forms, including quizzes, objective tests, in-class and at home essays, and periodic graded homework assignments.

 

United States History II

Grade 11 or 12

2 Semesters Level 3 

This course explores the history of the United States from the Spanish American War until the 2000s. Units of study included, the Spanish American War, Progressivism, World War I, The Jazz Age, The Depression, World War II, The Cold War, Civil Rights, and Modern Topics in US History.  Students will be assessed on factual information as well as on their ability to analyze and draw connections between historical events. Students will demonstrate knowledge through various forms of authentic assessment.  Some will be traditional, such as unit tests, essays, and research projects, while others will be non-traditional, such as flipped classroom and project-based learning. 


 

United States Government and Politics

Grade 11 or 12

2 Semesters Level 3 

This course provides an introductory examination of the U.S. political system, including the development of its framework, traditions, and values over the past 200 years. Themes/topics include the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government; institutions of the national government; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; political beliefs and behaviors; civil rights and civil liberties; and public policy. Discussion of current events will help students to apply theory and concepts to relevant daily experience. 

AP United States History

Grades 10 and 11

2 Semesters Level 1 

This course offers students the opportunity to do college level work in United States History.  The course requires extensive reading and essay assignments.  Units of study include Pre-colonial America to Post World War II Diplomacy.  The course attempts to prepare the student for a Spring College Board examination, which awards college credit to successful participants.  A variety of classroom techniques expose the students to college format and demands.  Department approval is required for admission into this course.  There will be a summer reading assignment

Honors Topics in United States History

Grades 9,  10 and 11

2 Semesters Level 2


This course is a thematic survey of American historical, political, and social developments from the establishment of the English Colonies (beginning in the 1600s) to the Modern Era. A variety of classroom techniques expose the students to the rigors of an Advanced Placement level course and attempts to prepare the student for AP level courses. Students interested in AP United States History and AP United States Government are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course Students will develop critical thinking skills, analyze primary sources, research methodology skills, place events in context, and understand the role of the political process in history as a result of this course. This course requires extensive writing assignments, research, and class discussion. Students will demonstrate knowledge through various forms of authentic assessment. Some will be traditional, such as unit tests, essays, and research projects, while others will be non-traditional, such as flipped classroom and project-based learning. Department approval is required for admission into this course.   There will be a summer reading requirement.

AP United States Government and Politics

Grades 11 and 12

2 Semesters Level 1

This course is offered to students who wish to do college level work in U.S. Government and Politics.  It is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of politics of specific examples.  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Themes/topics include the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; institutions of the national government; public policy; and civil rights and civil liberties. Historical research and analysis of historical documents will be required as well as assigned summer readings. The format is seminar style, requiring independent study by the student and extensive individual participation in group  discussions.  Department approval is required for admission into this course.  There will be a summer reading assignment.

Honors United States History II

Grade 11

2 semesters, Level 2

 In this course, students will study United States history from the Industrial Age to the present.  Cultural, economic, political, and social events of the period will be explored through research, discussion, writing assignments, and long-term projects.  Topics will include industry and innovation, immigration, desire to build an empire, U.S. emergence as a world power, World War I, the Roaring 20s, the Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and recent presidential administrations.  Students will learn not only historical facts, but how to analyze point of view, make connections between events, and assess the actions of American leaders over the past century.  The course will require a great deal of participation from the students.  History Department approval is required to enter this course, and there will be a summer reading assignment. 

Honors United States Government and Politics

Grades 11 and 12

2 Semesters Level 2 

This course provides an examination of the U.S. political system, including the development of its framework, traditions, and values over the past 200 years. Themes/topics include the constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government; institutions of the national government; political parties, interest groups, and mass media; political beliefs and behaviors; and civil rights and civil liberties. Discussion of current events will help students to apply theory and concepts to relevant daily experience. This course is designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Historical research and analysis of historical documents will be required, as well as assigned summer readings. Department approval is required for admission to this course.

 

AP Human Geography

Grades 11 and 12

2 Semesters Level 1

The AP Human Geography course is an elective and is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012).  Department approval is required for admission into this course, and there will be a summer reading assignment.

Honors Comparative Government and Politics

Grades 11 and 12

1 Semester Level 2 

Honors Comparative Government and Politics is a one semester course that introduces students to the rich diversity of political life outside the United States. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures; policies; and the political, economic, and social challenges among six selected countries: Great Britain, Mexico, Russia, Iran, China, and Nigeria. Additionally, students examine how different governments solve similar problems by comparing the effectiveness of approaches to many global issues. This course is an elective open to all those who have completed or know they will complete their required History coursework.  Department approval is required for admission into this course, and there will be a summer reading assignment.

Honors Contemporary Issues

Grades 11 and 12

1 Semester Level 2

Honors Contemporary Issues is a one semester course designed to increase student interest in contemporary problems and issues. Students will be encouraged to use primary and secondary materials to form opinions and propose solutions to problems. Topics will include international, national, state, and local issues such as governmental policies, economics, the media, trade, military conflict, environmental concerns, etc. Special attention will be given to issues that constitute the critical concerns of the Sisters of Mercy. Students will read articles in various magazines, newspapers and online databases. They will answer questions on these articles and use them as a basis for discussion. They will also view videos on news programs and evaluate them. There is no required text for this course; resources will be largely digital. This course is an elective and open only to those who have completed or know they will complete all required History coursework.  Department approval is required for admission into this course.

HISTORY DEPARTMENT SEQUENCING COLLEGE PREP 3-YEAR SEQUENCE

Freshman  Year-- World Cultures
Year 2-- United States History I OR *United States History II (Department prefers)
Year 3-- United States Government and Politics

COLLEGE PREP 4-YEAR SEQUENCE

Freshman Year-- World Cultures/Honors World Cultures
Sophomore Year-- United States History I 
Junior Year-- United States History II 
Senior Year-- United States Government and Politics 

HONORS SEQUENCE

Freshman Year-- World Cultures/Honors World Cultures
Sophomore Year-- Honors Topics in United States History
Junior Year-- Honors United States Government and Politics 
Senior Year-- Honors Comparative Government/Honors Contemporary Issues

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SEQUENCE 

Freshman Year-- Honors World Cultures
Sophomore Year-- AP United States History
Junior Year-- AP United States Government and Politics
Senior Year-- AP Human Geography 

 *GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS*

1 World Cultures (any level)
1 United States History (any level)
1 United States Government and Politics (any level)

*The above are the requirements for all current Sophomores and Freshmen.  Juniors are required to have 2 United States courses (History or Government) as those were the requirements when they began the program.  However, the History Department STRONGLY encourages all Juniors to take a Government course before graduation.  

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE GRADE REQUIREMENTS TO JUMP LEVELS:

To move from College Prep to Honors level-- 93
To move from College Prep to AP level-- 96
To maintain Honors level-- 85
To move from Honors to AP level-- 94
To maintain AP level-- 85